July 2016 News Letter

FIELD SHOW & SUMMER ORDERING IS HERE!

HOW TO ORDER YOUR UNIFORM ACCESSORIES SUCCESSFULLY!

  1. ORDER EARLY & ORDER ONLINE: Our processing time is 24 to 48 hours and standard shipping time is one week so make sure to plan ahead to beat the rush! The fastest way to get an order processed is to place it through the website! SPECIAL OFFER FOR ORDERING ONLINE: use coupon code WEBSITEBONUS to get $1 off each pair of shoes ordered!
  2. PURCHASE ORDERS: You can checkout online with a P.O.! Check out online as you normally would and select the payment option “Purchase Order”. In the box type the P.O. number, or if you don’t have one yet you can type in “P.O to follow” and we will email a copy of the invoice for you to get a PO. The order will be on hold until we receive a copy by fax or email.
    Fax: 805-456-0296 or sales@marchingworld.com
  3. TAKE NOTE OF CUSTOM ITEM PRODUCTION TIMES: Our products that take longer than 48 hours to ship will say their production time frame in the product details.
  4. TRACKING INFORMATION: With the large volume of orders coming in, often you will receive a package before we receive a tracking number! If you are worried about where your package is, send us an email at sales@marchingworld.com and include your order number so we can help you out!
  5. RETURNS: You can check out our return policy HERE. No returns will be accepted without a Return Authorization Number (RAN). To get an RAN please send an email request to sales@marchingworld.com with your order number and reason for return.
  6. HOW TO GET A QUOTE: The fastest and easiest way to get an accurate quote is to put all of your items in the cart and proceed to checkout as normal. Enter your billing and shipping and when you get to payment method select PURCHASE ORDER. In the box write: QUOTE ONLY and you will receive a formal quote to turn in for a P.O. or for payment. The invoice will be voided after 30 days if not confirmed.

June 2016 News Letter

FIELD SHOW & SUMMER ORDERING IS HERE!

HOW TO ORDER YOUR UNIFORM ACCESSORIES SUCCESSFULLY!

  1. ORDER EARLY & ORDER ONLINE: Our processing time is 24 to 48 hours and standard shipping time is one week so make sure to plan ahead to beat the rush! The fastest way to get an order processed is to place it through the website! SPECIAL OFFER FOR ORDERING ONLINE: use coupon code WEBSITEBONUS to get $1 off each pair of shoes ordered!
  2. PURCHASE ORDERS: You can checkout online with a P.O.! Check out online as you normally would and select the payment option “Purchase Order”. In the box type the P.O. number, or if you don’t have one yet you can type in “P.O to follow” and we will email a copy of the invoice for you to get a PO. The order will be on hold until we receive a copy by fax or email.
    Fax: 805-456-0296 or sales@marchingworld.com
  3. TAKE NOTE OF CUSTOM ITEM PRODUCTION TIMES: Our products that take longer than 48 hours to ship will say their production time frame in the product details.
  4. TRACKING INFORMATION: With the large volume of orders coming in, often you will receive a package before we receive a tracking number! If you are worried about where your package is, send us an email at sales@marchingworld.com and include your order number so we can help you out!
  5. RETURNS: You can check out our return policy HERE. No returns will be accepted without a Return Authorization Number (RAN). To get an RAN please send an email request to sales@marchingworld.com with your order number and reason for return.
  6. HOW TO GET A QUOTE: The fastest and easiest way to get an accurate quote is to put all of your items in the cart and proceed to checkout as normal. Enter your billing and shipping and when you get to payment method select PURCHASE ORDER. In the box write: QUOTE ONLY and you will receive a formal quote to turn in for a P.O. or for payment. The invoice will be voided after 30 days if not confirmed.

March 2016 News Letter

SIGN UP TODAY FOR USA’S LEADERSHIP PROGRAM AND CAMP!

USA Camp Prepares and Grows Student Success in Leadership and Performance!

  • Complete and balanced program:  leadership, spinning, conducting, specialty sessions and private coaching sessions

  • USA’s Leadership Program is relevant, practical and designed to support the Band Director
  • 3 different performance evaluations with feedback and awards

Get the Best in Leadership and Performance Training — register and pay by June 1st to get $20 off!

 

NEW ITEMS ON SALE!

Check out our specials and sales category – with new items coming soon! Ton’s of never before used plumes, hats, flags, gloves, shoes, and more!

Specials will continue to be updated throughout the next season, so make sure to check back periodically.

Click HERE to see what is on sale today!

February 2016 News Letter

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“Sound of Spirit” Marching Band Award!

Varsity is giving away a Marching Band Award! See submission details below. Click HERE to see the brochure (pages 4-5).
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Sign up today for the USA Drum Major Performance Showcase.  Prepare for tryouts and perform in uniform at the Performance Showcase March 19th!
See details HERE!

Win an iPad Air in our latest contest!

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Win an Apple iPad Air from Peacocks Marching World!

Follow this link to enter the contest or check it out on our Facebook page!

*TO ENTER:

  1. Click on the ‘Participate’ button
  2. Send invitations to your friends and family on Facebook, Twitter, email and text message
  3. Check back to see how many friends joined (and how many entries you’ve received)

Person with the most referrals wins the Grand Prize!

*Contest ends December 9th, 2015

November 2015 News Letter

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Peacocks Marching World Feature with LTC Jay Brewer of Texas A&M University

Formed in 1894, The Fightin’ Texas Aggie Band is known nationally as the “Pulse of Aggieland.” Through the years, the band has grown to over 400 members. They are the largest military marching band in the nation and each week perform a new drill featuring traditional marching music. While at most large football stadiums, fans run to the concession stands the moment halftime begins, at Kyle Field the Aggie 12th Man not only stays, they stand for the entire performance to support the band, showing their appreciation for the difficult drill with a Whoop! (the Aggie sign of approval)  and applause.
Texas A&M University is rich in traditions and the Corps of Cadets, of which the Aggie Band is an integral part of, is known as the Keepers of the Tradition. The band is there to support all traditions, from Midnight Yell practice, to the Corps of Cadets March In and Review, and other campus traditions. Even staff members on campus speak of how hearing the band’s rehearsal each morning starts their day with energy. Not only does the band perform for campus events, but they are a favorite at community parades and other functions, especially those honoring our nation’s military members and veterans.
The band functions as it does due to the strength of student leaders. There are three drum majors, each with their own leadership responsibilities, as well as a student band commander, company commanders and other leaders for each of the bands outfits. These students lead and teach others in traditions, music and drill, and life skills needed for navigating a large and academically strenuous campus. Those leaders are supported by staff members from the Corps of Cadets and by LTC Jay Brewer, who frequently has band members in his office for advice and support. It is the students that have kept him with the Aggie Band program, not only the students who are great leaders and successful from their freshmen year, but more importantly, the students who struggle and have to learn how to rise from mistakes and failures. Seeing those students grow and finally succeed, whether academically or personally, to Colonel Brewer is better than writing the best drill. Sending Aggies into the world with the Texas A&M values of Loyalty, Integrity, Excellence, Leadership, Selfless Service, and Respect is the best tradition of the Fightin’ Texas Aggie Band.

For more information about the music programs at Texas A&M University, please visit our website, http//:musa.tamu.edu

 

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October 2015 News Letter

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Peacocks Marching World Feature with Jeremy Duby M.M. Director of Bands at Olivet College

History: When did your group first start your activity and how has your group/you continued to participate?
The Olivet College Marching Comets were a staple on campus during the 70’s.  For varying reasons, the program dwindled, and now, during the fall of 2015, has made a triumphal return after a 30 year hiatus.  The comeback has revitalized spirit on campus, and has strengthened relationships with all students, alumni, community members and especially the athletic department.

Traditions:  What traditions are you working to create and carry on within the music programs you work with?
The band performs their warm up routines in the college square the morning of game day.  The football team gets blessed in our church every game day, and then walks to the stadium by police escort.  The band now marches the team (still with police escort) down main street from the church to the stadium.  Once there, the band plays in the tailgate area to energize the fans for the game.

Leadership: What kind of Leadership opportunities are you providing for your participants? Were your provided these opportunities as a participant or student?
As the band is small while we rebuild, there are no drum majors or section leaders individually at this time.  The students have all taken an active leadership role as a band member.  They have taken roles in designing apparel, organizing fund raisers, and promoting the program across the campus and the surrounding communities.  The students have taken a great ownership of the program, and we work together to build upon the legacy of our alumni, and to create our own legacy to hand down to the future Marching Comets.

Community:  How are your students representing the community (and institution) through performances?  Are there any particular events that stand out? 
We perform at our annual kick off ceremonies for the Athletic department.  We will begin to play at our annual move in day celebration next year.  The band has been asked to march in parades in our local towns, and is also very visible and active during big campus events such as homecoming.  The band marches around the square in a pied piper fashion collecting student groups and leading them to the bon fire pep rally.     We are especially looking forward to representing the college internationally by performing in La Grande Parade De Paris – Champs Elyées on New Year’s Day in Paris, France.

How can someone get involved with your band?
Students can contact the director of bands, Jeremy Duby at (269)749-7158 or jduby@olivetcollege.edu for more information regarding the college and its music program and to schedule an audition.  The band is open to music majors and non-majors alike.

Why do you do this?
Band in general is the central part of school pride and spirit.  The marching band is the most visible part of this program.  We are at most of the athletic and college events throughout the school year, adding an electric atmosphere to the events and a collaboration of all students and fans in attendance.  Internally, there is no better team building than working with the marching band.  The students bond and create a large family atmosphere within the campus community.  The students take a special ownership of the ensemble, and a great deal of pride in the program and institution.

Is there a website or link you would like people to go to?
http://www.olivetcollege.edu/ – Facebook: OCcometbands – Instagram: @marchingcomets

August 2015 News Letter

Peacocks Marching World Feature with Old Dominion University Director of Athletic Bands Alexander Trevino

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History: When did your group/you first start your activity and how has your group/you continued to participate?
The first Monarch Marching Band was formed in 2008 after one year of preparation (instrument ordering, uniform design, recruiting) and one year prior to the official debut date of September 5th, 2009. I decided to start one year early for two reasons: to make sure that we could, when the time came, field a working marching band with all of the necessary instrumentation to be successful, and to make recruiting much easier. It’s
much easier to show people what you are planning on having than just telling them. And if we were going to have problems with having enough students, I didn’t want the first time to acknowledge this problem to be two weeks before our official debut.

So taking one year prior to the first football game gave me time to assess and tweak what we were going to do once our first official season started—from practice schedule, to travel, to recruiting, to even music selection—and the time to do it without the pressure of having to be “ready fro prime-time” right out of the gate.

Out of an expected 150 member group in that test year, we started with 88. However, the 88 members who started the band were the best type of student we could have wished for—they all had extensive experience from high school, LOVED marching band, and were slightly adventurous. Many of them were attracted to the idea of laying the groundwork for what was sure to be a long-standing tradition at Old Dominion, and their freedom to help craft the image of the band and to set the standard from day one energized them. In the converse, many students stayed away from that first year because they didn’t know what to expect. One of our snares told me during the first week of camp that his dorm roommate he was assigned was also a snare drummer in high school band, but didn’t want to join the band “in case they sucked”. Students with that type of mentality we rarely pursue, even today. It’s the difference between someone riding a bus and someone driving—one is just happy to be along for the ride, and the other is not happy unless they can help decide the direction of the journey. We want the “drivers”.

Not surprisingly, after the bands first public performance at an event held for incoming freshman the Friday before classes began, close to 50 students came up to us (including the roommate from above) and asked if it was too late to join. Because I had set the requirement before camp that membership was contingent on attending the two-week camp, and because letting people join after the hard work had already been done wouldn’t be fair to those who put the work in to have such a great performance—good enough to attract 50 people to want to join!—I thanked them and let them know when auditions for
2009 would be held, and that we had already set the band for the year.

That was really then when I set the standard of “If not better, then not bigger”. I’ll take 88 hard-working, risk-taking, loyal and dedicated students before 200 students if it means not sacrificing quality, and in that I include attitude, loyalty, and dedication, in addition to great playing and marching skills. Joining when it’s easy doesn’t count as much as joining when it’s hard. I joke with the students that we are “Forged in the Crucible of August and tempered in the Cold of November,” not only in our marching, playing, and discipline training but in our camaraderie and bonding as a family. In some ways, it makes what we do special. Holding that standard is what, I think, has kept our band steadily growing in quality (and size) to its current size of 185.DSC_0166

Traditions: What traditions are you working to create and carry on within the music programs you work with?
Having just finished our 7th season since 2008, we are still building traditions as best one can “build” tradition. In my experience here, tradition as it’s understood by the students or the administration is what we have been able to do on a consistent basis and that they like. It’s really hard to say what is tradition when, as most directors and bands know, most of what we do is just standard operating procedure, but if the crowd likes it, and
then you don’t do it and people complain, more than likely it’s become a tradition whether you realize it or not!

For us, it’s things like playing certain songs to accompany the game situation on the field, like for sacks, first-downs, touchdowns, etc.), sending a small pep band around the stadium to play in between plays (and even serenading lucky/unlucky Port-a-John users—the very fist time I took a band around the stadium to teach the Drum Majors what I wanted (they do it exclusively now) I surprised someone coming out of the Port-a-John, and he loved it, and the DM’s have been doing it ever since—no complaints yet!).

I think overall traditions should be fun, appropriate of course, and involve anyone who wants to be a part—at the end of our fight song we have an 8 count drum break where you can spell MONARCHS, and every year that moment becomes louder as more people realize that that is what you do there, and everyone else is doing it, and that it’s our tradition.

Overall, I want one of our prime traditions to be to have fun—keep the crowd entertained, have fun doing it, and do it well. If we hit those things, then everything that stems from that is just a bonus.

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Leadership: What kind of Leadership opportunities are you providing for your participants? Were your provided these opportunities as a participant or student?
I always tell applicants to leadership positions that if they think there is glory and reward for becoming a leader, they shouldn’t apply. Being a leader, I believe, means being a servant first. Everything a leader does should be in service of their charges, whether that is teaching them marching drill, rehearsing them in sectionals, or simply listening to them if they are having a bad day. There are no trophies for being a good leader except the knowledge that you are helping others become stronger, whether through encouragement, teaching, or any form of support. I learned that early on as a Baritone Section Leader in the University of Texas Longhorn Band (BM ’95) and strive to work in the very same way in my current position as Director of Athletic Bands. Student success is the marker of my own success, and it doesn’t work the other way around.

We have many opportunities for our students to take a leadership role within the program, and not just with titles that say as much. Our student staff includes Uniform, Equipment, Library, Recruiting, and Instrument staff positions, which all take the same mettle and dedication that a section leader positions requires. Students in these staff positions routinely work in an administrative capacity with fellow students to make sure everyone has the equipment and tools they need to be successful. They devise procedures for checking-out, maintaining, and checking-in instruments, uniforms, etc. and employ those procedures with little oversight from me—I trust these students implicitly to get the job done, and in a friendly and engaging way. They become a model for students of what contributing to the program can look like, and hopefully will encourage others to take a staff position in the future.

Community: How are you and/or your students representing the community (or institution) through performances? Are there any particular events that stand out?
Everywhere the band goes, we are ambassadors of the university—there is no hiding the fact when we are in uniform, because as I designed it, there is no direction we can face that hides where we are from and who we represent. When we travel, I am very clear what the expectations are for their representation of our program, our university, and themselves. I take great pride in speaking with hotel or restaurant staff who wish to let us know that they enjoyed having the band stay with them, how polite and well mannered they are, etc. I know a lot of that I can’t take credit for (their families have more claim to that than I!) but it makes me proud to know that we have those types of students in our group—models of citizenship that confound expectations for how most people believe “college kids” behave.

When we perform at away games, in front of fans who have no idea who we are, we always make an impression on the event staff, security, and the home fans, who have regularly come up to us during or after the game to shake my hand, or thank students directly for their performance. We don’t respond to taunts or other statements made towards us, except to smile and say “Enjoy the game”, and I think not being what people expect or have experienced from other visiting bands is what prompts so many of them to come and talk to us. After one such game, as the band was loading, a Sheriff’s Deputy walked towards me and I began to panic a little—had there been an altercation, did one of my guys do something bad—and then he asked “ Are you the band director?” at which time I began to panic a LOT. “Yes, I am” I responded, and he put out his hand to shake mine and said “You have a terrific band—I played trumpet in high school and I really enjoyed watching them having fun and playing in the stands.” I told him I was a little scared when he walked up and asked if I was the director and he said “We didn’t have any problems with your band tonight, which I can’t say for some other bands”. I’ll take that!

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What would you like people to know about your work or your students’ work?
I’d like them to know about the great things that the students have been able to do at Old Dominion in a very short amount of time, and that the development of the program is still ongoing. If someone is excited about a chance to continue in the creation of the program and to have a unique experience in doing so, I hope we hear from them. We are different in a lot of ways from the typical college marching band—mainly we have a lot of
freedom to be who we want—if one show we want to do a DCI-type show and the next we want to play Bruno Mars and Pharell Williams, we will, and they way we do it doesn’t have to be dictated by anything other than “will it be good?” and “will it be entertaining
to the crowd”.

Those first 88 students from 2008, and the students who joined for the first official band in 2009, we call “Plank Owners”. We live in a Navy town, and anyone with a Navy background is familiar with the term. A “Plank Owner” is any member of a naval
vessel’s first crew and comes from the days of sail, when the decks of boats were made of wooden planks. In those days, sending a new ship to sea was an uncertain prospect— weather, leaks, unseen shoals, and other hazards could easily make a first voyage a final voyage, and crew members took a large amount of risk being the first to sail on a new boat. However, when the ship was decommissioned after years of service, each crew member was allowed to take one of the planks of the deck as a memento and as thanks
for “writing the book” on the boat, especially if it was the first in its class.

For us, those students who took the risk of joining the band despite it not even existing yet, and “wrote the book” on who were are and what we could do, are very much an owner of this program and its history, no matter how long history will be. And while there are no “planks” for them to claim, I have told them all that one day (hopefully soon!), when we have a band hall built for us, there will be one wall dedicated to the Plank Owners, made from planks of wood, with each of their names and years
listed individually on each plank. I owe much to those students, and I think that would be a fitting tribute to what they were able to do, against many odds, to help get our program off the ground and in the best possible way.

How can someone get involved with your band?
Students wishing to join the band or find out more information can email us at mmb@odu.edu or visit www.odu.edu/mmb for more information. Students must pass a playing audition to attain membership, and scholarships are available for exceptional auditions. Scholarships range from $500.00 to $1500 for incoming students and increase yearly for continuing student membership. The Monarch Basketball Band also has auditioned spots that pay an additional $500.00 for the spring semester. The band is traveling to Ireland in 2016 to march in the St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Dublin and many students are using their scholarship awards to pay for their trip!

Why do you do this?
I’ve been doing marching band since August of 1985, when I first learned to march and play at the same time at Burbank High School in San Antonio, Texas. There I learned the joys of marching and being a family, of working together towards one goal. When I arrived at the University of Texas as a member of the Longhorn Band, it seemed like everything increased exponentially—the fun, the camaraderie, the experience of performing, and I think it was then that I was hooked. There was no doubt that I wanted to keep doing this as long as I could. When I graduated, I taught at Midway High School in Hewitt Texas for 7 years, and was then lucky enough to be accepted as a graduate assistant at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, where I was able to work with the Pride of the Southland Marching Band, which was my first experience with the “behind the scenes” of a college marching band program. By the time I completed my time as a Graduate Assistant Director at the University of Washington, I had two things: a Ph.D. and a pretty good idea about how to lead a college marching band—what works, what doesn’t, what was indispensable, and what the ultimate role of a college marching band is for the university. When I was offered the chance to create a marching band where none ever existed before, I knew I could do it. Terrifying? Yes. Stressful? That word doesn’t even come close to describing how it was. Rewarding? ABSOLUTELY.

I don’t know if I was in the right place at the right time, lucky, or both, but this has been a once-in-a lifetime chance for someone in my line of work, and a chance that many have told me they would have never taken because of the level of uncertainty that came with the position. It was and still is hard, there is so much more to do, so much possibility to explore, and while the work might tire me out by the end of the day, it’s the excitement of new possibilities and potential that get me out of bed again in the morning. When I hear the crowd roar for the band, and see the looks of joy on my student’s faces as they receive their ovations, I know we’re on the right track, and I want to see what we can do to keep bringing the students to that moment again and again.

Is there a website or link you would like people to go to?
Our official site is www.odu.edu/mmb where one can join our prospective member database so we can keep them up-to-date with news from our season, performance announcements, or television appearances, or to view videos of our current and past seasons, as well as visit our Facebook page and to follow us on Twitter. Links can be found on each page for the respective social media account of web service.

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July 2015 News Letter

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Peacocks Marching World Feature with University of Pittsburgh Assistant Director of Bands Matthew Alosi

History: When did your group/you first start your activity and how has your group/you continued to participate?
The Varsity Marching Band at the University of Pittsburgh was founded in 1911.  The university was in its 22nd football season when the first Pitt Band appeared at Forbes Field on October 14, 1911, at the Pitt-Ohio Northern game. The band was organized by Dr. Earl Miller and James G. Oliver with Carl Sabad as the student leader and Don Kirk as the manager. The eight-man contingent wore “uniforms” of scarlet felt caps with blue tassels and played seven instruments borrowed from Becker’s Music Store. Funds from students, alumni and friends of the University were given to buy the caps and tassels. In 1912 E.V. Babcock, former mayor of Pittsburgh and well known industrialist, bought the first real uniforms, including mackinaws as protection against bad weather.

Traditions:  What traditions are you working to create and carry on within the music programs you work with?
Coming Out of the Hole:  This tradition has been with the Pitt Band since 1925 when the band’s traditional entrance into the stadium was through the tunnel, called the hole, in Pitt Stadium.  Though Pitt Stadium was torn down, the tradition still lives on as the band makes their way out of the holes on the closed end of Heinz Field.

Herald Trumpets:  In 1958, Director Ace Arthur added herald trumpets for the band.  It is a tradition that the first component seen during the pregame show is herald trumpets marching silently to center field to play a fanfare and to silently march off.

Smoke:  After the Heralds finish their fanfare, the drum line section leader screams “Slam” as all the drums start to roll.  All that members see in front of them is a wall of smoke.  The band starts cheering.  Then, through the smoke the Drum Major and drumline emerge onto the field.  The drumline plays a cadence and once they finish, the Drum Major gives two long whistles and four short whistles.  The hole once again fills with smoke as the entire band emerges out and onto the field.  It is said that about 20 years ago a drummer asked that a fire extinguisher be set off as they run out of the hole.  Ever since then, smoke has been a signature of the Pitt Band Pregame Show.

Drum Major:  The Pitt Drum Major position is rather unique to most major colleges.  There is no set pregame routine that they have to follow.  The Pitt Band has had drum majors dance, twirl, do backbends, splits, strut, jump into the stands, or a combination of each.  Each Drum Major brings their own signature to the position.

Seniors Dot the I:  The last game of each season is the day that seniors, who have served the band for so many years, are honored.  At the end of the halftime show, the band breaks into a run cadence and forms the PITT formation from the pregame show.  The seniors form a large dot over the I.  The rest of the band leaves the field as each senior has had their name read, they march off the field playing “Victory” one last time.

Singing in the Hole:  This tradition is one from Pitt Stadium that went away and was brought back in 2002.  As the band assembles in the hole to prepare for Pregame, the chant is heard as one member starts “Sound the note, take up the cry” by the end “Onward to Victory” the entire band has joined in.  From there, the band sings Victory, Hail to Pitt, the Alma Mater, finally ending with “No one breaks the Ranks!”

“No one breaks the ranks!”  This is a chant done right before the band gets ready to go on.  Everyone raises their hands in the air and claps in rhythm ending with everyone screaming “No one breaks the ranks!”

March to Victory:  After the Pregame Concert is a parade.  When on campus, the parade proceeded from the Quad up “Cardiac Hill” to the stadium.  Now, the parade starts on General Robinson Street and marches to Heinz Field where fans line up to greet the Pitt Band as it marches by.

Leadership: What kind of Leadership opportunities are you providing for your participants? Were your provided these opportunities as a participant or student?

Students have the opportunity to audition and interview for the spots of drum major, assistant drum major, section leader, and squad leader.  They may also elect to participate in one of three service organizations.

Community:  How are you and/or your students representing the community (or institution) through performances?  Are there any particular events that stand out?  
The Pitt Band annually performs for all Pitt home football game in Pittsburgh’s iconic Heinz Field.  Additional performances may include away football games, professional sporting events, local parades, and as an exhibition band at various high school band festivals/competitions.

How can someone get involved with your band?
All candidates must complete an audition prior to the beginning of Band Camp.  Auditions are by appointment.  Wind instrumentalists may submit a video or audio tape with a letter of authentication from their High School Band Director in lieu of “in person.”    Positions in the drum line, color guard, and Golden Girls (majorettes) are held each spring.

Is there a website or link you would like people to go to learn more?
www.pittband.com

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Shoe Sizing and Shoe Kits

The Best Way to Order Shoes and Size Your Group with the Shoe Sizing Kit!

 

Included in the Shoe Sizing Kit are:
• 12 Pairs of Shoes in a range of sizes to help you size your students.
•Use our handy Sizing Kit Instructions and Charts (which can be emailed on request) to help keep track of the sizes you need! Here’s how it works: Student Chart (Chart A) – This chart for recording shoe sizes of individual students is for your personal reference and records. When sizing students, write each student’s name down and record his or her size (circle “M” for Men’s size and “W” for Women’s size; write out the word “wide” for wide sizes). Once all students are measured and sizes recorded, use the Sizing Sheet to tally the totals for each individual shoe size.
• Sizing Sheet (Chart B) – This is the full tally of all shoes needed to fill your order. Don’t forget to use sizing kit shoes to help fill your order and to deduct any usable shoes from your totals before placing your order online!

 

Tips for Sizing Your Students:
• Try on shoes in a carpeted area.
• Have students wear the same socks that will be worn during performances.
• Order half sizes for students that fall between provide sizes. Order wide shoes for students with a wider foot.
• Use as many of the sizing kit shoes as you can to fill your full order.

 

Please keep the following in mind:
• Have students try on shoes in a carpeted area. Soiled or scratched shoes are not returnable.
• Any shoes you need to return must be returned within 30 days. You must contact us ahead of time for a Return Authorization Number.
• Place your full order early! Standard shipping takes approximately one week.
• Placing your order ONLINE insures that you move to the front of the line! It decreases the chance of mistakes, it’s quick and easy, you can review your order, AND we offer FREE SHIPPING on orders over $500!
***Don’t forget to sign up for our newsletter and like us on Facebook for special offers!***

 

www.marchingworld.com
Everything You Need To Perform.